Listed Buildings: Midhurst

The Midhurst Society has compiled a loose-leaf folder of some of the listed buildings in the town and surrounding parishes.  This is not for sale, but we have made the basic listing information of all 106 properties in Midhurst (SU 8821) available here.  There are a further 88 properties in Easebourne, and Phil Stringer and Chris Deadman are compiling details for inclusion on a separate page.

Listed details are in street order. Click on the PDF links below.  Some of the files are quite large and may take a few minutes to download.

The basic listing details are complete, and we have added recent photos -ancient and modern!  (Grateful thanks to Dave Rudwick for sharing his amazing collection of Midhurst photos.)  We now want to make the listings more interesting by adding more old photographs, historical data and anecdotes  Please let us have your memories and back-stories and we will continue to update these pages.

You might also be interested in discovering more about war memorials and plaques, whether listed or not.  This website, a U3A project, has details:  http://ww1memorials.midhurstu3a.org.uk/

The U3A project also researched the stories of some of the names on the various memorials.  They can also be found on the link above.

The pdf pages below contain a variety of information on some of the buildings in Midhurst. As well as architectural details of the building, other content may include photographs, possibly a story or anecdote, perhaps some information about who once lived there, or maybe a newspaper extract.  The one thing the buildings have in common is that they are categorised as having special architectural and historic interest. Commonly referred to as “listed” buildings, they are afforded protection under the planning system for future generations to enjoy.

Although the history of having an inventory of ancient and historical monuments can be traced back to the early 1900’s, it was resulting from the Town and Country Planning Acts after the second world war that local authorities were required to develop policies and proposals for the development of land. Simultaneously, powers were given to them to preserve buildings of architectural and historical interest. It was this power that created what we know today as the listed building process.
There are many examples of Grade II in Midhurst - shops, a Catholic church, almshouses, pubs, the former public library, restaurants, even a gate and a telephone kiosk!  The Parish Church and The Spread Eagle Hotel are both Grade II*.  Midhurst also has a Scheduled Monument: Motte and Bailey Castle on St Ann’s Hill.

Chris Deadman kindly summarised what the different categories mean:
Grade II - Most listings are in this category. It means the buildings are of “special interest”.
Grade II* - These are deemed “particularly important” and “of more than special interest”.
Grade I – Midhurst doesn’t have any buildings that are deemed of “exceptional interest”.
 
Scheduled Monuments - This designation denotes “national significance”, a classification reserved for specially selected sites.  Midhurst has the Motte and Bailey Castle on St Ann’s Hill, which appears on the Historic England website but not on British Listed Buildings.

Parks and Gardens can also be classed as being of Special Historic Interest, celebrating designed landscapes of note, and encouraging appropriate protection.  A pity, perhaps, that we have no record of the collaboration on South Pond and Close Walks Wood between the Rev. Tatchell and Gertrude Jekyll!
 

Map


Bepton Road

See PDF here

Church Hill - East

See PDF here

Church Hill - West

See PDF here

June Lane / Lamberts Lane

See PDF here

Knockhundred Row

See PDF here

Market Square/ Edinburgh Square

See PDF here

North Street, East side

See PDF here

North Street, West side

See PDF here

Petersfield Road

See PDF here

Red Lion Street

See PDF here

Rumbolds Hill

See PDF here

Sheep Lane / St Anne's Hill

See PDF here

South Street / Chichester Rd

See PDF here

West Street

See PDF here

Wool Lane / Duck Lane

See PDF here